Moderatorship connections between Stack Exchange sites

Consider the graph in which the vertices are Stack Exchange sites, connected if two sites share a moderator. What does this graph look like? As being a moderator correlates with some level of expertise or at least interest in the topic, we can expect the structure of the graph to highlight topical connections between the sites.

Unsurprisingly, there is a dominant component (55 sites) centered at Stack Overflow. (Click the image for the larger version.)

SO_component
Stack Overflow component

Its radius is 6: every site can be joined to Stack Overflow by a path of length at most 6. The five sites at distance 6 from SO are Lifehacks, Martial Arts, Physical Fitness, Space Exploration, and Travel.

By the triangle inequality, the diameter of the SO component is at most 12. In fact it is exactly 12: it takes 12 steps to go from Space to either Fitness, Lifehacks, or Martial Arts.

The center of the SO component is not unique: Web Applications is another site from which every other one can be reached in 6 steps. And it has an advantage over SO in that only four sites in the component are at distance 6 from Web Apps. Naturally, these are the four sites that realize the diameter 12 of the component.

That said, Stack Overflow is the vertex of highest degree (8), meaning that Stack Overflow moderators also take part in moderating eight other sites.

What about other components? Excluding isolated vertices, we have the following picture of small components.

other_components
Other nontrivial components

The largest of these is the “language component”: English Language & Usage, English Language Learners, Japanese Language, Portuguese Language, and less logically, Sustainable Living. Other notable components are Unix (with bioinformatics thrown in) and Mathematics.


Source of the information: on the page listing moderators grouped by users I executed a JavaScript one-liner

JSON.stringify(Array.from(document.querySelectorAll('.mods-summary-list')).filter(e=>e.children.length>1).map(e=>Array.from(e.children).map(x=>x.hostname.split('.')[0])))

which gave a list of connections. The rest was done in Python:

import networkx as nx
from itertools import chain, combinations
connections = # copied JS output
edges = list(chain.from_iterable(combinations(c, 2) for c in connections))
G = nx.Graph()
G.add_edges_from(edges)
components = sorted(list(nx.connected_components(G)), key=len)
main_component = G.subgraph(components[-1])
pos = nx.kamada_kawai_layout(main_component)
nx.draw_networkx(main_component, pos=pos, node_size=100)

I used different layout algorithms for the dominant component and for the rest. The default “spring” layout makes the SO component too crowded, but is okay for small components:

other_components = G.subgraph(chain.from_iterable(components[:-1]))
pos = nx.spring_layout(other_components, k=0.25) 
nx.draw_networkx(other_components, pos=pos, node_size=100)

The rest was done by various functions of the NetworkX library such as

nx.degree(main_component)
nx.center(main_component)
nx.diameter(main_component)
nx.periphery(main_component)
nx.radius(main_component)
nx.shortest_path_length(main_component, source="stackoverflow")
nx.shortest_path_length(main_component, source="webapps")

Top 10 xkcd comics according to Stack Overflow

Sorted according to the number of Stack Overflow posts (as of now) in which the comic is linked. The posts themselves can be seen by clicking the “posts” link.

#10: Standards (22 posts)

#9: Compiling (29 posts)

#8: Python (33 posts)

#7: Regular Expressions (36 posts)

#6: ISO 8601 (50 posts)

#5: Password Strength (60 posts)

#4: Wisdom of the Ancients (63 posts)

#3: goto (64 posts)

#2: Random Number (74 posts)

#1: Exploits of a Mom (680 posts)